Be Loud Blog

Be Loud Blog

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Format: 2020-10-23
Format: 2020-10-23

What is sexual assault?

What is sexual assault — and how does KCSARC help?

Sexual violence takes many forms, and includes behaviors and comments that are designed to make another person uncomfortable. The victim is usually someone with less power in a given situation. An example is a manager who comments on an employee’s body or makes requests for sexual favors.

Sexual assault is a form of sexual violence. It is any sexual contact or behavior that occurs without express consent. That includes rape, child sexual abuse, groping, and other behaviors.

Can sex ed prevent violence?

Sexual violence exists on a continuum that includes a range of behaviors: from sexist or raunchy jokes, to homophobic slurs, to physical sexual assault. 

The range of offensive and traumatizing behavior is wide, but it is all connected -- even supported  -- by ingrained cultural misunderstandings of gender, power, privilege, respect, personal boundaries, consent and other concepts that form the basis for building healthy relationships.

Survivors deserve better than MeToo Kits

This week, the state of Michigan banned the sale of so-called "MeToo Kits." 

Advocates have raised concerns about the commercial sale of "MeToo Kits," a product that is being marketed to sexual assault survivors and institutions such as colleges. The entity marketing this product suggests evidence collection following sexual assault can effectively be done at home.

Pyatt Promise Powers Prevention

KCSARC’s prevention educators often speak about the holistic work we do to end sexual violence in metaphoric terms, likening our response to sexual assault to saving people from drowning in a river. We pull individuals — survivors  — from the river, help them heal and hold offenders accountable with direct services, such as therapy and legal advocacy.

But what if we could stop people from falling in the river to begin with?

WordWatching the Criminal Justice System

The words we use to talk about sexual violence influence the way we perceive and respond to survivors. Using unaccountable language perpetuates a culture in which victims are devalued, sexual violence is tolerated, and perpetrators are not held accountable.

Statute of Limitations

UPDATE: Washington State's new law went into effect July 28, 2019. 

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